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Monthly Archives: November 2013

DJI Phantom 2 Vision Help Guide Videos

RTFdrones.co.uk little guide for the Phantom 2 Vision. This is made up from information found on the internet, some from users and some from DJI. DJI Phantom 2 Vision - Preparing to Fly DJI Phantom 2 Vision - How to connect to the DJI Vision App DJI Phantom 2 Vision - The basics of Flying, Recording & Sharing DJI Phantom 2 Vision - Intro to the Vision Camera DJI Phantom 2 Vision - Intro to your Smart Battery DJI Phantom 2 Vision - Intro to your remote controller DJI Phantom 2 Vision - Intro to your range extender DJI Phantom 2 Vision - Intro to GPS Flight Control


DJI Zenmuse Z15 Canon 5D Brushless Gimbal

Sorry we don't know the price but please email us if you like to place an order for the new Z15 5D. ANOTHER EVOLUTIONARY 3-AXIS PROFESSIONAL GIMBAL The DJI Zenmuse Z15-5D Gimbal, based on the technology of the Zenmuse Z15 series gimbal, inherited its predominant strength/weight ratio because of its unique structural design. This release marks another breakthrough in gimbal systems and the precision range of the control angle is within ±0.02°. When used with DJI A2 professional flight controller and an Octo-copter, it will remain stable and precisely with the highest level of stability in controlling any camera equipment even if the aircraft is in strong wind or at high speed. Undeniably, it is the top choice in professional filming or aerial photography. CUSTOMIZED GIMBAL DESIGN FOR THE CANON 5D Mark III/ 5D Mark II In order to ensure the gimbal functions at its best and submits nothing but industry level images, DJI provides a customized Gimbal in accordance with the latest in camera technology… the Zenmuse Z15-5D Gimbal is customized for the Canon 5D Mark III and Canon 5D Mark II for example. The Canon 5D series camera has been providing an unparalleled customer experience as it offers excellent video quality and a variety of recording formats, bit rates and frame rates… and with up to 1920×1080/24P shooting ability, the Canon 5D is a perfect camera for all in the world of aerial photography. MULTIPLE CONTROL MODES The Zenmuse Gimbal system offers three types of control modes. Orientation-locked control mode, Non Orientation-locked control mode and Back to Mid-point mode (Horizontal mode). These three modes can be switched both quickly and easily to support the many different requirements of aerial photography. 3-AXIS ROTATION CONTROL The 3-axis Zenmuse Gimbal system has a creative mechanical design. The control method is simple and easy to use as the movement range of the transmitter stick has direct control over the relative rotation speed. The tail potentiometer greatly increases control, stability and precision, and the internal slip rings avoid needlessly complicated wiring. Both the power and signal lines are integrated into the tubes of the Gimbal, which presents a completely unhindered control axis without limitation providing a maximum Yaw of ±360°, a maximum Pitch of +50° and -140° and a maximum Roll of ±50°. BUILT-IN INDEPENDENT IMU MODULE and INFRARED MODULE Our new stabilizing algorithm represents the latest in innovation which, together with our highly-precise induction devices, provides perfect performance of attitude control. This integration means that without the requirement of extra installation and connection of extra wires, it is both easy to assemble and extremely stable during flight. The gimbal also provides a specially designed and customized video output module, which includes an infrared shutter control function. GIMBAL SERVO DRIVE MODULE Due to our special DJI Customized Gimbal Servo Drive Module, the Zenmuse series of Gimbals offers excellent high precision control characteristics. With high precision, low vibration and high torque characteristics, this module provides additional quality stabilizing features. A TOTAL SOLUTION The Zenmuse Gimbal system is a perfect match to other DJI products such as Spreading Wings S800 and S800 EVO flight platforms, the A2 and WooKong-M flight controllers for multi-rotor and the Ace series of flight controllers for helicopters. Combined with the iOSD Mark II and the 5.8G video link, all together make up DJI’s Total Solution, which allowing you to enjoy a convenient, professional and complete aerial photography experience. Specifications General Built-In Functions Three Working Modes· Orientation-locked control · Non orientation-locked control · FPV mode (Reset) Built-in independent IMU module DJI gimbal special servos drive module Wireless video transmission supported Camera shutter control supported Wide range voltage input supported S-Bus/PPM Receiver supported Peripheral Supported Camera Current Supported Lens GCU Input Power Control Requirement CANON EOS 5D MARK II; CANON EOS 5D MARK III CANON EF 24mm f12.8 IS USM 4S~12S LiPo Battery Four spare receiver channels at least Assistant Software System Requirement Windows XP SP3; Windows 7; Windows 8 (32 or 64 bit) Mechanical & Electrical Characteristics Working Current Operating Temperature Weight Dimensions Static current: 200mA (@25V) Dynamic current: 400mA (@25V) Locked-rotor current: 4A (@25V) -10°C ~ 50°C 1.42Kg 204mm × 242mm × 264mm GCU BEC Output GCU Wireless Video Transmission Power GCU Weight GCU Dimensions 10A@12V 1A @12V 63g 64.2 mm ×34.1mm ×19.5mm Working Performance Load Weight (Reference Value) Controlled Angle Accuracy Maximum Controlled Rotation Speed Controlled Rotation Range 2615g(5D MARK II with SD Card & Battery & CANON EF 24mm f12.8 IS USM Lens) 2664g(5D MARK III with SD Card & Battery & CANON EF 24mm f12.8 IS USM Lens) ±0.02° Pan axis: ±90°/s Tilt axis: ±130°/s Roll axis: ±30°/s Pan axis control: ±360° continuous rotation Tilt axis control: ±From -120° to +15° Roll axis control: ±25°


Iran unveils the Fotros drone, their biggest yet

Iran unveiled a new aircraft Monday that it says is the biggest drone yet to be developed in the Islamic Republic, capable of staying aloft for up to 30 hours. Defense Minister Hossein Dehghan said the reconnaissance and combat drone Fotros has a range of 1,250 miles. That would cover much of the Middle East including Israel.   "This drone is able to carry out reconnaissance missions and carry air-to-surface rockets for combat operations," the official IRNA news agency quoted Dehghan as saying.   Dehghan said scientists at Iranian Aircraft Manufacturing Industries, affiliated to Iran's Defense Ministry, have designed and developed the drone. He said the country has achieved self-sufficiency in building drones but didn't elaborate. Read more...


US Drone crashed into a guided missile cruiser

A US Navy Drone malfunctioned on Saturday afternoon and crashed into a guided missile cruiser off the coast of Southern California, causing two injuries, say officials. The incident happened while the vessel was testing a combat weapons system. The drone malfunctioned and crashed into a U.S. Navy ship off the coast of southern California, injuring two sailors, officials said. The drone, which was being controlled from Point Mugu, was being used to check the USS Chancellorsville's radar-tracking system Saturday when it malfunctioned, the Los Angeles Times reported. At about 1:25 p.m., the drone struck the side of the ship, causing some damage and injuring two sailors, CNN reported. Both sailors were treated for minor burns. The ship, which has a crew of about 300 sailors, was returning to San Diego for inspection, the Navy said. The Navy is investigating the cause of the malfunction.


UK drone scans for nuclear leaks

University of Bristol researchers have unveiled a large semi-autonomous drone “which could be used to provide visual, thermal and radiation monitoring of radiation after a release of nuclear material”, said the University. Jointly funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and Sellafield, it is intended to avoid some of the problems that occured at the Fukishima disaster where, according to the University, as well as causing the reactors to fail, “the inundation also disabled 23 of the 24 radiation monitoring stations surrounding the site, leaving disaster response teams effectively ‘blind’ to the ensuing radiation hazard. Helicopter-based activities including monitoring were conducted at the risk of significant radiation exposure to the crews because a suitable alternative was not available.” Called the Arm system, it has been built by two members of Bristol’s Interface Analysis Centre (IAC), Dr Oliver Payton and Dr James Macfarlane, around using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) with on-board computers and sensors. In demonstrations to observers from Sellafield and the National Nuclear Laboratory, said Bristol, over the past six months the team has radiation mapped radioactively contaminated sites in south west Romania as well as a naturally-occurring radiation anomaly in Cornwall, in rain, snow and high winds. “By using light-weight and low-cost unmanned aerial vehicles systems, we can immediately and remotely determine the spread and intensity of radiation following any such event. The systems have sufficient in-built intelligence to deploy them following an incident and are effectively disposable if they become contaminated,” said IAC director Dr Tom Scott, adding: “Concurrently with project Riser, which is developing micro-unmanned aerial vehicles for the indoor mapping of radiation, we have developed an outdoors system that is now ready for commercial deployment.” The technology is to be offered to Japan as a tool for surveying the ongoing Fukishima clean-up. The team is also working on UAV mapping and exploration algorithms for detecting buried explosives and depleted uranium ordinance. - See more at: http://www.electronicsweekly.com/news/products/sensors/128145-2013-11/ University of Bristol researchers have unveiled a large semi-autonomous drone “which could be used to provide visual, thermal and radiation monitoring of radiation after a release of nuclear material”, said the University. Jointly funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and Sellafield, it is intended to avoid some of the problems that occured at the Fukishima disaster where, according to the University, as well as causing the reactors to fail, “the inundation also disabled 23 of the 24 radiation monitoring stations surrounding the site, leaving disaster response teams effectively ‘blind’ to the ensuing radiation hazard. Helicopter-based activities including monitoring were conducted at the risk of significant radiation exposure to the crews because a suitable alternative was not available.” Called the Arm system, it has been built by two members of Bristol’s Interface Analysis Centre (IAC), Dr Oliver Payton and Dr James Macfarlane, around using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) with on-board computers and sensors. In demonstrations to observers from Sellafield and the National Nuclear Laboratory, said Bristol, over the past six months the team has radiation mapped radioactively contaminated sites in south west Romania as well as a naturally-occurring radiation anomaly in Cornwall, in rain, snow and high winds. “By using light-weight and low-cost unmanned aerial vehicles systems, we can immediately and remotely determine the spread and intensity of radiation following any such event. The systems have sufficient in-built intelligence to deploy them following an incident and are effectively disposable if they become contaminated,” said IAC director Dr Tom Scott, adding: “Concurrently with project Riser, which is developing micro-unmanned aerial vehicles for the indoor mapping of radiation, we have developed an outdoors system that is now ready for commercial deployment.” The technology is to be offered to Japan as a tool for surveying the ongoing Fukishima clean-up. The team is also working on UAV mapping and exploration algorithms for detecting buried explosives and depleted uranium ordinance. - See more at: http://www.electronicsweekly.com/news/products/sensors/128145-2013-11/#sthash.HbUcKYvP.dpuf


Syrian rebels claim they captured government drone, a DJI Phantom

A miniature aircraft with an attached camera, which rebels say belonged to forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad, is seen inside a room in Homs, Syria on Nov. 11, 2013. By David R Arnott, NBC News Syrian rebels this week showed off a miniature drone that they claim to have brought down using frequency interference. Fighters from the Free Syrian Army told Reuters that the unmanned, remote-controlled aircraft belonged to President Bashar al-Assad's forces. The rebels released a series of aerial photos that they said had been taken from a camera mounted on the drone. The images show the widespread destruction in the rebel-held city of Homs. More than 100,000 people have died since the Syrian conflict started two and a half years ago, the United Nations says.  


Researchers developing possum targeting drones

Researchers in New Zealand are working on developing a new way of targeting possums, one of New Zealand's most destructive pests. TBFree NZ and Landcare Research are working on a designing a drone that can specifically identify possums. The drone, which is equipped with thermal imaging cameras, uses a special computer programme to tell the difference between the pest and other animals, such as sheep and birds. TBFree NZ hopes the drones will also help farmers identify where they have clusters of possums, meaning they can better position poison drops and traps. "What we've come up with is something that's looking at two rapidly evolving technologies and combining them into an application that's going to help us determine where possums are in a more cost efficient manner than what we currently do," said TB Free NZ's Simon Andrew. However, drone operators will be required to have a special licence and adhere to strict controls. TB Free NZ anticipates that the use of the technology will eventually help control the spread of disease. Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is contagious disease carried by possums that can kill cattle and deer, posing an economic risk to the country's billion dollar agriculture industry. The Department of Conservation also has high hopes for the drones. "If control operations also target rats, native wildlife should benefit," the department said. If you're interested in thermal imaging for your UAV drone system, RTFdrones sell FLIR TAU2, Quaks and thermal imaging cores, please contact us.


Sandia Labs Volant transformer drone

Hello to the Volant Multi Modal Vehicle drone, UAV Sandia Labs thinks the future of military drones isn’t surveillance and dropping bombs. It’s transformation: a single unmanned vehicle drone that can fly, swim, drive, and even hop like a frog across a variety of terrains and obstacles. Conceived by the Intelligent Systems, Robotics and Cybernetics unit at Sandia National Laboratories, the “Multi-Modal Vehicle Concept” would travel land, sea, and air by transforming itself to accommodate different terrains. Its wings become fins as it dives into water, or underwater paddles that shed casings to reveal wheels as it moves toward land — wheels with the ability to jump 30 feet into the air. An entire campaign could be conducted by a remote operator or, more likely, semi-autonomously. As it stands now, carrying out a similar mission would require coordinating a team of unmanned aerial, undersea, and ground vehicles made by different manufacturers with different communications systems. It would take careful planning to make sure all vehicles are in place at the right time. But Sandia says that because the Multi-Modal Vehicle is designed modularly and works off one interface, it won’t be subject to those same hang-ups, and that it can adapt mid-mission as conditions change. “The real value added is that it allows maximum flexibility in highly complex missions without the concern over whether or not all of the vehicles are positioned just right,” said Jon Salton, a Sandia engineer working on the project. Sandia has such high aspirations for the Multi-Modal Vehicle that they say it might eventually be able to carry out missions usually reserved for Special Operations forces. “ should be at least be able to substantially enhance the capabilities of Special Ops,” said Salton. Thus far, Sandia has built and conducted limited testing on conceptual hardware, designating it a “mature concept.” Next on the list is to secure funding for the prototype and approach industry partners to turn the concept into reality. Multi-Modal Vehicle does have its limitations. Because it sheds parts and material as it transforms from one mode to another, recovery is almost impossible — making every mission an expensive one-way trip.


28 Minute Phantom 2 Vision Flight Test

Yes the DJI Phantom 2 Vision can fly for 28 minutes Like most people I doubted that the Phantom 2 Vision can actually fly for 25 minutes, so Mr Colin Quinn of DJI went out to do a little endurance test. Flew two flights, both over 25 minutes.


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